Walla Walla Reflections

Train Tracks in Walla Walla 5 Minutes Before a Storm Arrives, originally uploaded by foolscircle.

 

Photo Details:
Camera: Nikon D80
F-Stop: f/5.3
Focal Length: 70 mm
Exposure Bias: -0.67
Shutter Speed: 1/400
ISO: 100

So I’ve returned home from Walla Walla and gone from a lot of cold and rain to… well, more cold and some rain that’s set to appear in the near future. Still, I was lucky while I found myself roaming around the town’s streets, mainly because I managed to catch some beautiful brief moments of sunshine in the midst of all the storm clouds that kept on lurking across the sky. As I said before, I wasn’t really looking to take that many photos while I was in Washington, mainly because I was too busy being a social butterfly… still, I found myself happy with a couple of the images I did manage to capture.

As you can clearly see, I returned to the train tracks and shifted the location slightly in order to avoid the presence of that ugly fence from before. The silos and trees just happened to be situated on the walk from my hotel to Whitman’s campus and I also just liked the way they looked. It’s one of the unique properties of Walla Walla: there doesn’t seem to be any set system to the city’s neighborhoods. Immediately around the Whitman campus, most of the houses are actually very nice and seem to be something straight out of Better Homes & Gardens. Within a couple of blocks distance, though, things quickly degenerate and seem to become more than a little run down due to teeming weeds and poor paint jobs. It’s strange, because neighborhoods seem to change from block to block with no discernible transition in between; one seems straight out of a Norman Rockwell painting, crossing the street will bring a pedestrian into an area overrun with shady buildings and lawns scattered with car parts.

Nature and industrialism seem to mix in the same awkward manner. As a result, it’s not uncommon to find a building ringed by evergreen trees sitting next to a field that’s populated by farming equipment, silos, and some beat-up looking boxes. It’s funny, because when I was attending Whitman I grew pretty acustomed to the startling contrast without even realizing it. Coming back to the area after spending roughtly eight months away, though, I was pretty shocked to see the town through fresh eyes. It was a little weird, and just a little sad, to realize that I’d simply grown used to seeing the massive differences… and it was probably a little sadder that I just forgot about it when I came back to the Bay Area.

At least this time around, I’ll have these photos to remind me of how much of a difference a city block can make.

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Explore posts in the same categories: Photography, travel, walla walla, washington

One Comment on “Walla Walla Reflections”

  1. mostlyme Says:

    Wow. Fabulous photos. Usually I have something sassy to say. Or something nice that is enhanced with a dash of smarm. But your snowy photos have left me speechless and impressed and inspired. And you talk shop. Lovely. Can’t wait to look at your flickr feed.

    You should definitely check out: http://strobist.blogspot.com/.


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